Description Pricesort descending
CINCINNATI OHIO 1852 STAMPED FOLDED LETTER TO SALEM MASSACHUSETTS. SCOTT 11A CINCINNATI OHIO 1852 STAMPED FOLDED LETTER TO SALEM MASSACHUSETTS. SCOTT 11A EARLY USAGE PLUS GREAT LETTER

Scott 11A is listed in Scott as first issued in 1853. This 11A is tied to a stamped folded letter mailed March 27, 1852. Solid and full postmark. Letter is between business partners Edward D. Kimball of Salem, and John Swasey, in Cincinnati at that time. It discusses upcoming cotton transactions as well as the writer's daughter visiting the recipient. Excellent early historical letter of commerce in the mid 1800s.

John Swasey, bark, 294 tons, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1850. Reg. June 10, 1851. Nathaniel A. Kimball, Edward D. Kimball, Franklin D. Reed, Boston, John Swasey & Co., Cincinnati, owners; John Phillips, master. Reg. Jan. 17, 1853.  Nathaniel A. Kimball, Edward D. Kimball, Thomas P. Pingree, John Swasey & Co., Cincinnati, owners ; Samuel Hill, master. Reg. Sept. 15, 1854.  Edward D. Kimball, Nathaniel A. Kimball, Chas. H. Miller, Thomas P. Pingree, owners; William Arnold, master.

THE NAUMKEAG STEAM COTTON COMPANY

David Pingree (1795-1863), merchant, ship owner, president of the Naumkeag Bank, and Mayor of Salem in 1851, was the first president of the Naumkeag Steam Cotton Company. He was succeeded by Edward D. Kimball (1811-1867), also a Salem merchant and ship owner. Both of these men were also active in the African trade, their ships going to West Africa or Zanzibar. It seems to be somewhat more than coincidental that one of the products most in demand in Africa was American cotton cloth, which was traded for hides, ivory, and particularly gum copal, a resin used in varnish. This connection allowed another new industry to flourish in Salem, Jonathan Whipple’s gum copal processing works at the foot of Turner Street.

The Africans prized the fine quality cotton sheeting. They called it ‘Mericani (American cloth). A specific example is taken from the outward manifest of the brig Ganges of Salem for October 5, 1839. Among a mixed cargo is found an entry for four cases (4,505 ½ yards) of bleached shirting valued at $527.11.14 The primary (later, exclusive) product of Naumkeag Mills, was cotton sheeting.

The company grew steadily. By the turn of the 20th century more than 2,700 looms were in operation weaving Pequot sheets, and in 1909 the Danvers Bleachery became part of the Naumkeag operation. The mills were Salem’s largest

employer and, in turn, provided jobs for immigrants from Ireland, French Canada, and Poland and Eastern Europe. But disaster struck on June 25, 1914. The mill complex, then consisting of twenty buildings, perished in the great Salem fire.

$100.00
russia-1864-stampless-folded-letter-from-secretary-of-czar-alexander-2nd RUSSIA - 1864 STAMPLESS FOLDED LETTER FROM A SECRETARY OF CZAR ALEXANDER II

Clean letter with postmarks. A translator in St. Petersburg informed us that the letter is from a secretary of Czar Alexander II informing the recipient that he has permission to file certain documents with the government. 

$100.00
seldovia-alaska-rare-1925-registered-cover-to-bokenas-sweden ALASKA - SELDOVIA RARE 1925 REGISTERED COVER TO BOKENAS, SWEDEN

Rare cover from a sparsely populated alaskan village.  Strip of four Scott #557 stamps used to frank cover.  Backstamps indicated it went through New York Foreign mail route. Includes Bokenas receiver.The town's original Russian name, Seldevoy, translates to "Herring Bay", as there was a significant herring population prior to rampant overfishing early in the 20th century.  Until the development of a more complete road system in Alaska, Seldovia was an important "first stop" for ships sailing from Seward, Kodiak and other points outside Cook Inlet. At one time Seldovia was home to over 2,000 residents, but today fewer than 300 persons reside year round.

$100.00
NEWPORT KENTUCKY 1833 STAMPLESS FOLDED LETTER SIGNED BY TOWN FOUNDER JAMES TAYLOR, JR.

Important historic letter from Newport Kentucky (manuscript postmark and 37 1/2-cent rate) signed by James Taylor, Jr., founder of Newport, for his father, James Taylor. Letter is to Benjamin Brown, Mount Vernon Ohio attorney and is a brief note regarding the filing of a deed for Irwin Thompson. Letter is on heavy stock and easy to read. Two small holes where two wax seals were broken do not affect text or appeal of this item. Outstanding addition to any postal history stampless collection.

Benjamin S. Brown was eminent in his profession, and well known throughout the State. He was a member of the Mount Vernon Library Society.

James Taylor, Jr. (1769–1848) was an American banker, Quartermaster general, and one of the wealthiest early settlers of Kentucky. He was a founder of the city of Newport, Kentucky. Taylor was the fifth child born to James Taylor Sr. and Anne Hubbard Taylor in Midway, Virginia. His father, James Taylor Sr., bought 2,700 acres (11 km2) of land in Northern Kentucky from his friend George Muse, which was part of the land Muse had been awarded for his military service in the French and Indian War. The Taylor family had two cousins, James Madison and Zachary Taylor, who later become presidents of the United States. On April 1, 1792, just short of his 23rd birthday, James Taylor Jr. left his father's plantation for Kentucky accompanied by three slaves, Moses, Humphrey and Adam, along with an English Army deserter, Robert Christy, and Christy's wife and their three children. They reached Newport June 20 but couldn't find lodging so he stayed at Ft. Washington in Cincinnati. His enslaved men worked through the summer to clear 16 acres (65,000 m2) in fields along the Licking, plant two corn crops and build a small cabin on lot no. 6 at the southwest corner of Second Street and Central Avenue. He became the driving force behind the settlement's development. He laid out the first road to Lexington in August with Jacob and Edward Fowler. In 1794 James Taylor tapped his connections with Kentucky's leaders to lobby at Frankfort for acts incorporating Newport and creating Campbell County, Kentucky. The legislature established the county on December 17, 1794 from parts of Mason, Scott and Harrison Counties. On December 14, 1795 it approved Newport's charter. James Taylor Jr. and Keturah Moss Leitch were married on November 15, 1795. James and Keturah Taylor had 11 children, but only four survived to maturity.

In 1803, James Taylor Jr. solicited the help of his cousin, James Madison, who was then U.S. Secretary of State, to persuade the federal government to move the Ft. Washington military post from Cincinnati to Newport. The Newport Barracks replaced Fort Washington across the river in Cincinnati, Ohio. There were but 4 acres (16,000 m2) in the original tract, which was bought from the old Colonel Taylor estate for the minimal price if $1. In 1806, two additional acres were bought for $47. Taylor was hired as the superintendent of the construction of the barracks. He was to erect three buildings.

Gen. James Taylor Jr. was Quartermaster General and paymaster of the Northwestern Army during the War of 1812, thus Newport became a vital center for war supplies.

During a storied lifetime, James Taylor Jr. operated ferries across both the Ohio and Licking rivers, helped to found banks, invested in the mammoth Newport Manufacturing Co., operated saw and grist mills along the Licking River, was part owner of a salt-works at Grants Lick, Ky., ran a tanning business and in his spare time was known to collect fossils and hunt buffalo at Big Bone Lick in Boone County.

James Taylor Jr. and his wife were members of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Newport, on the Courthouse Square. He and his wife Keturah were laid to rest at the Taylor Family Plot Evergreen Cemetery, Southgate, Ky. At his death, James Taylor Jr. was said to be one of the wealthiest men in the state of Kentucky, with an estate valued at more than $4 million.

In the mid-19th century, Newport became a hub for trade, industry and culture. Just a few years later, Gen. Taylor's grandson established the wealthy area of East Row, a collection of elegant homes. Today, the East Row local Historic District is the second largest local district in Kentucky and the Taylor Mansion is the district's oldest house. Taylor is the namesake of the General James Taylor Park.

 

 

 

 

$100.00
PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA BLOOD'S PENNY POST, DISPATCH MARK AND 3-CENT WASHINGTON STAMP PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA BLOOD'S PENNY POST, WITH DISPATCH MARK AND 3-CENT WASHINGTON STAMP

Full penny post seal with acid tie.  Full Blood's Dispatch mark.  Blue Philadelphia postmark over damaged 3-cent Washington stamp. Color of stamp indicates it's a #10.  However, condition of stamp does not permit confirmation.  Small cover with in good condition with slight soiling. Catalog: $375. 

$100.00
SCOTT 68A 10-CENT GREEN ON COVER TO BLUEHILL MAINE SCOTT 68A 10-CENT GREEN ON COVER TO BLUEHILL MAINE

Early cover to Bluehill Maine.  Cannot make out point of origin in postmark. Addressed to Charles Clough. Quality condition considering its age. Stamp clear on three sides, just touching at left.

THE DANIEL CLOUGH HOUSE AND PLACE

Daniel Clough was the first child of Asa and Abigail (Tecker) Clough born April 11,1790; married Polly, eldest daughter of Dr. Nathan and Mary (Carleton) Tenney, May 24, i818. She was born April ll, 1797; died Dec 8,1858; he died April 2,1867, aged 77. He was a sea captain in his younger years and commanded among other vessels the three-masted schooner ''Magnolia" built at Bluehill in 1833, the second vessel of that rig known. After sea life he gave attention to the management of his farm. The house he lived in was built by him about the time of his marriage, say about 1820, and is still standing, in good repair, and occupied by his youngest son, Charles Carroll Clough and family, who also own the farm of his grandfather, Asa Clough. The children of Capt. Daniel and Polly  (Tenney) Clough were:

, 1. Caroline, born Nov; 30,1818; married Capt. William Walker, half brother of the writer, June 24,1836.

2. Mary Tenney, born Nov. 1, 1820; married George W. Brown Jan. 11, 1840 and died at Ellsworth in 1852.

3. David Daniel, born Feb. 26,1826; removed to Portland where p he was twice married, his two wives dying, leaving no children; he died a few years ago.

4. Augustine Washington, born Oct. 9, 1831; was a captain in the War of the Rebellion; married at Portland in 1865; had two daughters; he and wife died a few years since at Everett, Mass.

Charles Carroll, born July 7,1837; married Emeline S.,daughter of Johnson Wood, May 24, 1859; they had three children born to. them, viz:—Harriet Gertrude, Feb. 28, 1861; Bessie Carroll, Sept. 2, 1872; Daisey Lou, Dec. 22,1878.

$125.00
PRESIDENTIAL SERIES (SCOTT 803-834) COMPLETE NEVER HINGED MINT STAMP SET WITH COILS PRESIDENTIAL SERIES (SCOTT 803-834) COMPLETE NEVER HINGED MINT SET WITH COILS

Complete sets of the Presidential Series including the horizontal and vertical coil stamps in closed mounts. We opened the 1/2-cent value to determine that the set was never hinged. Please note the following: the 3-cent horizontal coil and 1-cent vertical coil are canceled.

$125.00
NEW YORK TO PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS VIA MARSIELLES FRANCE TRANSATLANTIC COVER - RARE RATE AND ROUTE NEW YORK TO PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS VIA MARSIELLES FRANCE 1861 TRANSATLANTIC STAMPLESS COVER - RARE RATE AND ROUTE

Very interesting 1861 transatlantic stampless cover (no contents) originally mailed in New York City with a pen notation that it was to go to Plymouth Massachusetts via Marsielles France.  See second scan of backside markings for Calais and Paris. Note additional French marking on front of cover.  The New York 30 marking is rare.

$125.00
haverhill-massachusetts-milford-new-hampshire-conant-postal-history HAVERHILL MASSACHUSETTS SOCK ON THE NOSE 1850S BLUE POSTMARK TO MILFORD NEW HAMPSHIRE. SCOTT 26A STAMP

Nice Scott #26A stamp with light blue Haverhill Massachusetts postmark on this cover to Milford, NH. Looks like writer has placed his/her initials in the lower left corner.

$150.00
Zeppelin-cover-October-28-Akron-to-Chicago-via-Friedrichhafen-postal-history-flight-with-C-18-stamp ZEPPELIN COVER - OCTOBER 28 AKRON TO CHICAGO VIA FRIEDRICHHAFEN POSTAL HISTORY FLIGHT WITH C-18 STAMP

Good cover with extra leg through Germany. New York backstamp as well.

$165.00

Pages